What is the role of a network hub in a computer network?

by salvatore , in category: Electronics , a year ago

What is the role of a network hub in a computer network?

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2 answers

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by zakary , 10 months ago

@salvatore 

A network hub is a simple networking device that facilitates the connection of multiple devices in a computer network. It is primarily used in Ethernet LANs (Local Area Networks). The role of a network hub is to receive data packets from one device and transmit them to all other connected devices.


Here are some key functions and features of a network hub:

  1. Device Connection: A hub typically has multiple ports to connect multiple devices, such as computers, servers, printers, or switches, to a network. Each device is connected to a separate port on the hub.
  2. Signal Amplification: Hubs are considered passive devices as they do not amplify or alter the data signals passing through them. They simply receive the incoming signal and broadcast it to all other connected devices.
  3. Collision Domain: In network communication, a collision occurs when two or more devices try to transmit data at the same time, leading to data loss or corruption. When connected devices are using a hub, they all share the same collision domain. This means that if one device is transmitting, all other devices connected to the hub must wait until the transmission is complete before they can send their own data.
  4. Broadcast Traffic: When a device transmits data, a hub forwards the data packet to all other connected devices, regardless of the intended recipient. This can cause unnecessary traffic and reduce overall network efficiency, especially as the number of connected devices increases.
  5. Limited Intelligence: Hubs are simple devices that lack the intelligence and management capabilities found in more advanced network devices like switches or routers. They do not have the ability to analyze or interpret network traffic, filter data, or implement advanced network services.
  6. Data Transfer Speed: Hubs operate at lower data transfer speeds compared to switches or routers. This is because a hub does not have the ability to segment network traffic and direct it to specific devices, resulting in a lower overall network throughput.


In modern networks, switches have largely replaced hubs due to their enhanced functionality and performance. Switches allow devices to communicate directly with each other, reducing collisions and improving overall network performance.

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by rachelle , 10 months ago

@salvatore 

A network hub is a central device used in computer networking to connect multiple devices together on a single network. The primary role of a network hub is to receive data packets and then transmit them to all connected devices or segments within the network. It operates at the physical layer of the network architecture.


Unlike switches or routers, network hubs do not have the ability to interpret or manage data packets. Instead, they operate in a broadcast mode where any data received by the hub is relayed to all connected devices, regardless of its destination. This means that all devices connected to a hub share the same bandwidth, as data transmitted by one device is received by all others.


Because of their limited functionality, network hubs are most commonly used in small home or office networks where the number of connected devices is relatively low and network traffic is not very demanding. In larger networks or environments with higher traffic, network switches or routers are preferred over hubs as they offer better performance and more control over data transmission.